A Slow Travel Guide To North Wales

November 16, 2021

A Slow Travel Guide To North Wales

Wales is one of the most perfect places when you need to slow down and simplify life by seeking out calm. The landscape is littered with coastal paths and hiking trails; golden beaches, hidden coves, rugged mountains, and dramatic cliffs. In locations where mobile signal gets patchy or even disappears completely, there's little point in over-planning. It's best to let the paths take you where they want to and embrace a slower way of living. Travelling sustainably and supporting local businesses. You can pack a lot into your trip without barely planning a thing. If you need a nudge in the right direction, this is my slow guide to North Wales.



Where To Stay In North Wales

Renting a cottage is, in my opinion, the best way to enjoy Wales or any secluded location. The weather tends to be unpredictable, as is always the case in the UK, and having somewhere cosy and warm to retreat to is always a relief. I'm fortunate to have family who own a cottage in Penmachno that allow us to stay there. Close by is the friendly village pub with rooms to rent, The Eagles Bunkhouse. Some villages can be cold to strangers but not this one. Everyone knows each other and are eager to welcome visitors. I imagine you will have a similar experience by booking in at one of the many family-run farms or pubs in and around Snowdonia's National Park. There are lots of stays available on AirBnB, as well as small B&Bs, huge cottages, hotels ranging from budget to luxury, and also camping options.


A Slow Travel Guide To North Wales A Slow Travel Guide To North Wales


Where To Visit In North Wales

The landscape of Wales is stunning. I encourage you to simply go outside and enjoy it. My favourite activity is a long walk down country paths and through the woods. There really isn't any need to seek out specific locations, although there are a few that are truly breathtaking. My favourite places to visit include Ffos Anoddun (the Fairy Falls), and Bodnant Garden. Gwydir Forest Park with its stunning waterfalls is also worth a visit, as are the Aber Falls with its hiking trails. I tend to stick to the tiny villages in North Wales. If you prefer a livelier atmosphere, head towards Llandudno, Portmeirion, or Bangor.




A Slow Travel Guide To North Wales


Where To Eat and Drink In North Wales

In all honesty, I don't tend to dine out when I travel to Wales. Staying at a cottage comes with the benefit of being able to cook your own meals. Apart from stopping for a coffee during the day or a drink at night, I stick to making meals at the place I'm staying. It keeps travel simple and low waste. It's good to have a few options when you're travelling around though, and while you might not find plant-based options in the smaller villages or local pubs; there are vegan-friendly restaurants in North Wales.





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